banner
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Neurorehabilitation: Are We Doing All That We Can?/ Barbara M. Doucet

By: Doucet B.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticle Media type: Article Subject(s): Neurologia | Rehabilitació cognitiva | Teràpia Ocupacional | RehabilitacióOnline resources: Accés restringit usuaris EUIT In: The American Journal Of Occupational Therapy 2012 JUL-AGO; 66 (4): 488-493Summary: Occupational therapists have many intervention tools available for working with clients having a neurological injury; however, some of the most innovative and effective methods have not gained acceptance by many clinicians. Emerging research and new technologies provide occupational therapists with a multitude of treatment strategies and novel devices, but incorporation of those tools into clinical practice appears to be limited by the time necessary to learn about the intervention, educational requirements associated with implementation, or lack of awareness regarding the evidence supporting the use of such tools. Strategies to combat this trend include educating clinicians on evidence-based methods for neurological rehabilitation, aligning academics with practitioners to translate evidence into practical treatment strategies, and accepting that occupational therapy can use these innovations as a means toward state-of-the art, occupation-based practice.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Journal article Journal article Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
En línia Exclòs de préstec ART-39358

Occupational therapists have many intervention tools available for working with clients having a neurological injury; however, some of the most innovative and effective methods have not gained acceptance by many clinicians. Emerging research and new technologies provide occupational therapists with a multitude of treatment strategies and novel devices, but incorporation of those tools into clinical practice appears to be limited by the time necessary to learn about the intervention, educational requirements associated with implementation, or lack of awareness regarding the evidence supporting the use of such tools. Strategies to combat this trend include educating clinicians on evidence-based methods for neurological rehabilitation, aligning academics with practitioners to translate evidence into practical treatment strategies, and accepting that occupational therapy can use these innovations as a means toward state-of-the art, occupation-based practice.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha