banner
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Goal-directed occupational therapy for children with unilateral cerebral palsy : categorising and quantifying session content / Nataya Branjerdporn [i 2 més]

By: Branjerdporn, Nataya [autor].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleContent type: text Media type: informàtic Carrier type: recurs en líniaSubject(s): Teràpia Ocupacional | Rehabilitació | Paràlisi cerebral | InfantsOnline resources: Accés restringit usuaris EUIT
Contents:
Jenny Ziviani, Leanne Sakzewski
In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 2018 MAR;81(3):138–146Summary: Introduction There is strong evidence that goal-directed occupational therapy achieves improvements in motor and self-care outcomes for children with unilateral cerebral palsy. This pilot study aimed to describe collaborative goals set in occupational therapy sessions, develop categories to describe session content and determine the percentage of in-session time spent addressing goal practice for children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Method Videos of 10 therapy sessions with 10 unique child–therapist dyads were analysed. Session content was categorised into goal practice (goal-directed therapy, meaningful goal-supporting activity) and other activity (non-goal-related, child engagement and behavioural support, parent engagement, transition). Descriptive statistics determined the percentage of in-session time spent in goal practice. Results Forty-three goals were set and 41 (95%) were activity focused. Mean percentage of time spent in-session on goal practice was 47.5% (SD 31.1%, range 0%–88.1%). Child behavioural support (4.9%), engaging parents (3.2%), transitioning between activities (6.7%) and non-goal-related activity (45.3%) comprised the remaining session time. Conclusion Less than half of session time was spent in goal practice, despite being conducted under a goal-directed framework. Non-goal-related activities comprised nearly half of in-session time. Therapists need to consider how to maximise time spent in goal practice during therapy sessions.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number url Status Notes Date due Barcode
Journal article Journal article Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
Internet
En línia Link to resource Not for loan 0000101719245
Journal Journal Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
Internet
En línia Link to resource Exclòs de préstec (Accés restringit) Consulta en línia 262471

Jenny Ziviani, Leanne Sakzewski

Introduction
There is strong evidence that goal-directed occupational therapy achieves improvements in motor and self-care outcomes for children with unilateral cerebral palsy. This pilot study aimed to describe collaborative goals set in occupational therapy sessions, develop categories to describe session content and determine the percentage of in-session time spent addressing goal practice for children with unilateral cerebral palsy.

Method
Videos of 10 therapy sessions with 10 unique child–therapist dyads were analysed. Session content was categorised into goal practice (goal-directed therapy, meaningful goal-supporting activity) and other activity (non-goal-related, child engagement and behavioural support, parent engagement, transition). Descriptive statistics determined the percentage of in-session time spent in goal practice.

Results
Forty-three goals were set and 41 (95%) were activity focused. Mean percentage of time spent in-session on goal practice was 47.5% (SD 31.1%, range 0%–88.1%). Child behavioural support (4.9%), engaging parents (3.2%), transitioning between activities (6.7%) and non-goal-related activity (45.3%) comprised the remaining session time.

Conclusion
Less than half of session time was spent in goal practice, despite being conducted under a goal-directed framework. Non-goal-related activities comprised nearly half of in-session time. Therapists need to consider how to maximise time spent in goal practice during therapy sessions.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha