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Can functional task exercise improve executive function and contribute to functional balance in older adults with mild cognitive impairment? : A pilot study / Lawla LF Law [i 2 més]

Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleContent type: text Media type: informàtic Carrier type: recurs en líniaSubject(s): Teràpia Ocupacional | Trastorns cognitiusOnline resources: Accés restringit usuaris EUIT
Contents:
Kenneth NK Fong, Matthew MK Yau
In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 2018 SET;81(9):495-502Summary: Introduction Individuals with cognitive impairment are more susceptible to falls associated with decreased executive function and balance. This pilot study investigated whether functional task exercise could improve executive function, which might further affect the functional balance in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. Method This was a single-group pre-test/post-test pilot. A total of 43 participants completed a 10-week structured functional task exercise programme, performing simulated functional tasks. Paired-samples t-test was performed to evaluate intervention effects. Associations between variables were examined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Multiple regression analysis was performed to explore the contribution of cognitive variables to functional balance. Results Significant improvements were shown in general cognitive functions, executive function, functional balance and functional status. All executive function outcomes were significantly associated with functional balance. Everyday problem-solving ability was the only significant cognitive contributor (β = 0.407, p < 0.05) to functional balance after controlling for the confounding factors. Conclusion This pilot showed functional task exercise using simulated functional task as a means of intervention was feasible and was associated with observed improvements in executive function and functional balance in older adults with mild cognitive impairment, whereas everyday problem-solving ability was found to be associated with functional balance. Further well-designed controlled studies are needed to draw more definitive conclusions.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number url Status Notes Date due Barcode
Journal article Journal article Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
Internet
En línia Link to resource Not for loan 0001017273883
Journal Journal Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
Internet
En línia Link to resource Exclòs de préstec (Accés restringit) Consulta en línia 262471

Kenneth NK Fong, Matthew MK Yau

Introduction
Individuals with cognitive impairment are more susceptible to falls associated with decreased executive function and balance. This pilot study investigated whether functional task exercise could improve executive function, which might further affect the functional balance in older adults with mild cognitive impairment.

Method
This was a single-group pre-test/post-test pilot. A total of 43 participants completed a 10-week structured functional task exercise programme, performing simulated functional tasks. Paired-samples t-test was performed to evaluate intervention effects. Associations between variables were examined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Multiple regression analysis was performed to explore the contribution of cognitive variables to functional balance.

Results
Significant improvements were shown in general cognitive functions, executive function, functional balance and functional status. All executive function outcomes were significantly associated with functional balance. Everyday problem-solving ability was the only significant cognitive contributor (β = 0.407, p < 0.05) to functional balance after controlling for the confounding factors.

Conclusion
This pilot showed functional task exercise using simulated functional task as a means of intervention was feasible and was associated with observed improvements in executive function and functional balance in older adults with mild cognitive impairment, whereas everyday problem-solving ability was found to be associated with functional balance. Further well-designed controlled studies are needed to draw more definitive conclusions.

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