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Return to work after stroke : Feasibility of 6-year follow-up / Julie Phillips [i 3 més]

By: Phillips, Julie [autor].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleContent type: text Media type: informàtic Carrier type: recurs en líniaSubject(s): Teràpia Ocupacional | Ictus | Estudis de factibilitat | RehabilitacióOnline resources: Accés restringit usuaris EUIT
Contents:
Kathryn Gaffney, Margaret Phillips, Kate Radford
In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 2019 GEN;82(1):27-37Summary: Introduction Little is known about long-term work sustainability of stroke survivors. A feasibility trial of early stroke specialist vocational rehabilitation had 32/46 (69.5%) participants available for follow-up at 12 months post stroke. Of these, 19/32 (59.4%) were in work. This study aims to determine the feasibility of longer-term follow-up and explore work status 6 years post stroke. Method Forty-eight participants fitting criteria for the feasibility trial were sent postal questionnaires measuring employment, income, mood, functional ability and quality of life, and were invited for interview to explore working 6 years after stroke. Ethical approval was obtained. Results Of the 48 participants, five (10.4%) had died; 19/43 (44.2%) responded. Fourteen were men; mean age 62 (24–78) years. Fourteen (74%) reported working (paid work n = 10, voluntary work n = 3, full-time education n = 1). Five had retired. Most (11/13) remained with preinjury employers. Half (8/15, 53%) reported decreased income since stroke. Compared to one year, median functional ability was marginally higher (extended activities of daily living 63 (IQR 8, range 32–66) to 60 (IQR 9, range 17–66)), but health-related quality of life was lower (EuroQuol Visual Analogue Scale mean 77.4 [SD 11] to 70.7 [SD14]). Six interviewees felt returning to work was the correct decision but struggled with invisible impairments. Conclusion This study suggests that long-term follow-up is feasible and that those who made a good recovery were more likely to respond. Work remains important to stroke survivors 6 years post stroke.
List(s) this item appears in: Novetats bibliogràfiques. Articles. Gener 2019
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Item type Current location Collection Call number url Status Notes Date due Barcode
Journal article Journal article Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
Internet
En línia Link to resource Exclòs de préstec 0001017282878
Journal Journal Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
Internet
En línia Link to resource Exclòs de préstec (Accés restringit) Consulta en línia 262471

Kathryn Gaffney, Margaret Phillips, Kate Radford

Introduction
Little is known about long-term work sustainability of stroke survivors. A feasibility trial of early stroke specialist vocational rehabilitation had 32/46 (69.5%) participants available for follow-up at 12 months post stroke. Of these, 19/32 (59.4%) were in work. This study aims to determine the feasibility of longer-term follow-up and explore work status 6 years post stroke.

Method
Forty-eight participants fitting criteria for the feasibility trial were sent postal questionnaires measuring employment, income, mood, functional ability and quality of life, and were invited for interview to explore working 6 years after stroke. Ethical approval was obtained.

Results
Of the 48 participants, five (10.4%) had died; 19/43 (44.2%) responded. Fourteen were men; mean age 62 (24–78) years. Fourteen (74%) reported working (paid work n = 10, voluntary work n = 3, full-time education n = 1). Five had retired. Most (11/13) remained with preinjury employers. Half (8/15, 53%) reported decreased income since stroke. Compared to one year, median functional ability was marginally higher (extended activities of daily living 63 (IQR 8, range 32–66) to 60 (IQR 9, range 17–66)), but health-related quality of life was lower (EuroQuol Visual Analogue Scale mean 77.4 [SD 11] to 70.7 [SD14]). Six interviewees felt returning to work was the correct decision but struggled with invisible impairments.

Conclusion
This study suggests that long-term follow-up is feasible and that those who made a good recovery were more likely to respond. Work remains important to stroke survivors 6 years post stroke.

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