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Cancer survivors’ experience of OptiMal, a 6-week, occupation-based, self-management intervention / Lauren Boland [i 6 més]

By: Boland, Lauren.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleContent type: text Media type: informàtic Carrier type: recurs en líniaSubject(s): Teràpia Ocupacional | Participació comunitària | Supervivents de càncer | AutoajudaOnline resources: Accés restringit usuaris EUIT
Contents:
Kathleen Bennett, Sinead Cuffe, Noreen Gleeson, Cliona Grant, John Kennedy, Deirdre Connolly
In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 2019 FEB;82(2):90-100Summary: Introduction Cancer survivors experience persistent symptoms such as pain, fatigue, anxiety and depression post-treatment, resulting in social isolation and decreased activity participation. A 6-week, occupation-focused, self-management programme, OptiMal, was delivered to cancer survivors. A mixed methods approach was employed to explore the impact of the programme. For the purpose of addressing the focus of this paper, only qualitative data were extrapolated. Methods A qualitative description design was undertaken with survivors to explore their perceptions of the impact of OptiMal on cancer survivorship and opinions of the programme. Qualitative data were collected through focus groups and semi-structured interviews post-intervention and at 3 months follow-up. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Four OptiMal programmes were delivered with 26 individuals of mixed cancer diagnoses over an 18-month period. Following thematic analysis, two themes emerged: 1. Supporting the transition to survivorship; 2. Programme design and delivery. The content and design of OptiMal was reported to meet cancer survivors' needs. However, many survivors stated that they would have benefited from it earlier post-treatment. Conclusion An occupation-based group programme, OptiMal, appears to assist cancer survivors to transition from treatment to survivorship. However, many survivors stated that they would have benefited from the programme earlier post-treatment.
List(s) this item appears in: Novetats bibliogràfiques. Articles. Març 2019
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Item type Current location Collection Call number url Status Notes Date due Barcode
Journal article Journal article Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
Internet
En línia Link to resource Not for loan 0001017286234
Journal Journal Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
Internet
En línia Link to resource Exclòs de préstec (Accés restringit) Consulta en línia 262471

Kathleen Bennett, Sinead Cuffe, Noreen Gleeson, Cliona Grant, John Kennedy, Deirdre Connolly

Introduction
Cancer survivors experience persistent symptoms such as pain, fatigue, anxiety and depression post-treatment, resulting in social isolation and decreased activity participation. A 6-week, occupation-focused, self-management programme, OptiMal, was delivered to cancer survivors. A mixed methods approach was employed to explore the impact of the programme. For the purpose of addressing the focus of this paper, only qualitative data were extrapolated.

Methods
A qualitative description design was undertaken with survivors to explore their perceptions of the impact of OptiMal on cancer survivorship and opinions of the programme. Qualitative data were collected through focus groups and semi-structured interviews post-intervention and at 3 months follow-up. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Results
Four OptiMal programmes were delivered with 26 individuals of mixed cancer diagnoses over an 18-month period. Following thematic analysis, two themes emerged: 1. Supporting the transition to survivorship; 2. Programme design and delivery. The content and design of OptiMal was reported to meet cancer survivors' needs. However, many survivors stated that they would have benefited from it earlier post-treatment.

Conclusion
An occupation-based group programme, OptiMal, appears to assist cancer survivors to transition from treatment to survivorship. However, many survivors stated that they would have benefited from the programme earlier post-treatment.

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