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Participation and quality of life for persons with oculomotor impairments after acquired brain injury / Sharon Gowdy Wagener [i 1 més]

By: Wagener, Sharon Gowdy [autor].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleContent type: text Media type: informàtic Carrier type: recurs en líniaSubject(s): Teràpia Ocupacional | Participació comunitària | Qualitat de vida | Dany cerebral | Percepció visualOnline resources: Accés restringit usuaris EUIT
Contents:
Robert Kreiger
In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 2019 AGO;82(8):476-481Summary: Abstract Introduction Acquired brain injury is a major diagnostic group treated by occupational therapists. This study explored participation in everyday activities and social roles, and quality of life for persons with acquired brain injury-related oculomotor impairments. Method Using a cross-sectional descriptive approach, 40 rehabilitation outpatients with acquired brain injury-related oculomotor impairments underwent semi-structured interviews using self-report measures of visual symptoms (ABI Vision Questionnaire), quality of life (PROMIS Global Health Scale), and participation (Assessment of Life Habits). Descriptive, correlational, and simple regression statistics were used for analysis. Results Visual symptoms were significant for 96.7% of the participants. Physical and mental quality of life scores were one standard deviation below population norms. Participation areas identified as very difficult or harder for 82% or more included recreation, education, work, home maintenance, and volunteering. Approximately 68% or more identified communicating in a group, reading, computer use, and driving as very difficult. Correlations between scores of visual symptoms and participation, and visual symptoms and physical quality of life, showed significant moderate negative relationships. Regression analyses indicated visual symptoms explained about half the measured difficulties in participation. Conclusion Awareness of the activities and roles that are likely to be disrupted by acquired brain injury-related oculomotor impairments enables occupational therapists to direct therapy where it matters most. Findings highlight the identified symptoms and participation areas.
List(s) this item appears in: Novetats bibliogràfiques. Articles. Octubre 2019
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Item type Current location Collection Call number url Status Notes Date due Barcode
Journal article Journal article Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
Internet
En línia Link to resource Not for loan 0001017296950
Journal Journal Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
Internet
En línia Link to resource Exclòs de préstec (Accés restringit) Consulta en línia 262471

Robert Kreiger

Abstract
Introduction
Acquired brain injury is a major diagnostic group treated by occupational therapists. This study explored participation in everyday activities and social roles, and quality of life for persons with acquired brain injury-related oculomotor impairments.

Method
Using a cross-sectional descriptive approach, 40 rehabilitation outpatients with acquired brain injury-related oculomotor impairments underwent semi-structured interviews using self-report measures of visual symptoms (ABI Vision Questionnaire), quality of life (PROMIS Global Health Scale), and participation (Assessment of Life Habits). Descriptive, correlational, and simple regression statistics were used for analysis.

Results
Visual symptoms were significant for 96.7% of the participants. Physical and mental quality of life scores were one standard deviation below population norms. Participation areas identified as very difficult or harder for 82% or more included recreation, education, work, home maintenance, and volunteering. Approximately 68% or more identified communicating in a group, reading, computer use, and driving as very difficult. Correlations between scores of visual symptoms and participation, and visual symptoms and physical quality of life, showed significant moderate negative relationships. Regression analyses indicated visual symptoms explained about half the measured difficulties in participation.

Conclusion
Awareness of the activities and roles that are likely to be disrupted by acquired brain injury-related oculomotor impairments enables occupational therapists to direct therapy where it matters most. Findings highlight the identified symptoms and participation areas.

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